Every Day is a Big Little Adventure

Building on the natural curiosity, deep passion and busy habits of young children, My Big Little Adventure offers a continually updated roadmap of activities, events and resources designed especially for their families and caregivers. My Big Little Adventure invites adults and kids to read, play, and explore together.

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Curiosity Ignites Interest in Learning

Young children are naturally curious and adventurous. Something they see or experience, or even read about, feeds their enthusiasm for a subject. Think big machines, dinosaurs, rain puddles, big buildings, things that rhyme or the color pink. A child may develop a lifelong passion, or a passing interest, from something they read about or do with you when they are very young. Themed-based learning uses this topic-of-interest strategy to bring into focus a collection of activities and adventures that reinforce one another and become particularly memorable and impactful.

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Explore what we have to offer:

....."what makes trees green?"

Has your child ever asked a question like that? Spring tends to prompt this specific color question because all the leaves budding out on the trees and the explosion of green against the blue sky. ("Why is the sky blue?" can wait for another day.)

It is always meaningful to see what your child might already know about any subject. They are little sponges after all. And so proud to share bits of things they know or guess. So start there.

Then you might go examine some leaves. Invite your child to notice, observe, describe, categorize, and start making some of their own connections based on what they see.

Then you can layer in some information. This can be what you know, or it can be a joint journey to a book, the internet, a friend who might be a "green thumb". You don't have to have all the answers, you just have to model the part about being curious...and the step toward finding out about things you wonder.

Some children are very capable of digesting pretty complicated material and can be repositories for all kinds of technical detail related to things they are passionate about - trucks, dinosaurs, their bodies, endangered species, plants, you name it.

Clorophyll makes plants green. It is a chemical. When you look closely at a leaf you can actually see where the clorophyll is by the colors of the parts of the leaves. Red tree leaves also have clorophyll, but it is mixed with other chemicals that make them red all summer long. (Flowering trees are different.).

The clorophyll sets off a process called photosynthesis. A really fun word to say. They Might Be Giants has a really fun album of kids songs - Photosynthesis is one of our favorite tunes!!

Only the green bits with clorophyll can generate the photosynthesis process which is how plants make their food and grow using water, air and light from the sun.

The really really important part of green leaves, clorophyll and photosynthesis is that the whole process cleans our air and makes sure we have enough oxygen.

And we need oxygen to breathe. This is a tree's superpower!

@bernheimforest
#mybiglittleadventure
#growupgreat
#ready4kalliance
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We're still thinking about #nationallibraryworkersday and the many benefits of reading for babies and young children .....

Moms, dad's, grannies, gramps, aunties, uncle's, friends, pastors, teachers......check out all the benefits of reading with littles ⤵️⤵️⤵️

#Repost @mamaguide
• • • • • •
Reading is one of my favorite ways to connect and spend time with my little ones.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
We started reading when they were just an infant and now both toddlers go and grab their own books and love “reading” on their own.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Whats your child’s favorite book?
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Find this helpful? Tag/ share with a mama ❤️
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How much fun is this?!
#babyplay

#Repost @learnandbloom
• • • • • •
• Pom Pom drop •⁣
I made a pom pom drop for my older boys when they were around this age and I remember how much they loved it. Super simple to remake for my 1yo now using a laundry basket, some cardboard tubes and pom poms!⁣

This activity develops their hand eye coordination, pincer grasp and fine motor skills as they purposefully choose and release each pom pom down the tube. It also makes a great sensory experience, feeling the fuzzy pom poms with their fingers and toes!⁣

Keep in mind pom poms are a choking hazard so always supervise closely. ⁣



#babyplay #babyplayideas #babysensory #babyactivitiesathome #learningmadefun #learningisfun #playislearning #playbasedlearning #playathome #busytoddler #toddlerplay #toddleractivities #kidsactivities #letthembelittle #lovetolearn #kidslearning #toddlerplayideas #sensory #sensoryplay #sensorybin #invitationtoplay #everydayplayhacks #sensorytray #diymum #diytoys
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We just learned it is #nationallibraryworkersday

If books are windows to the world....library workers are travel agents and sherpas and consierge. We are particularly grateful for their book lists, storytime tips and ways to inspiring a love of reading right from the start!

Thanks @louisvillefreepubliclibrary
#mybiglittleadventure #growupgreat
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Look down!!

What kind of tracks can you see? In the dirt, in the grass, in the garden, on the kitchen floor. Animal, human and machine tracks are everywhere.

Wonder. Explore. Discuss.

#mybiglittleadventure
#everydaylearning
#growupgreat
#ready4k
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MBLA promotes loose parts play as a way to enhance creativity, strengthen fine motor and gross motor skills, encourage cooperation, collaboration and teamwork, develop persistence and resilience.

Loose parts play involves a collection of natural and synthetic materials offered as tools for play in a non-structured environment. No objective, no rules, no right way. Children are invited to use the materials in any way they might like and for any purpose. Adults stay out of the way and let children drive the play process here.

@kyscience is having a Loose Parts Playground event on April 17. It is free with admission to the science center, and all the Loose Parts Playground activities will be outside making it a great event for enjoying with your family during COVID.

We can't wait!! Hope to see you there.

#mybiglittleadventure
#growupgreat
#ready4kalliance
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MBLA partner @familyscholarhouse reminded us that it is #nationalcrayonday

#Repost @familyscholarhouse
• • • • • •
For many of us, crayons were the first thing we learned to write with. They were the colorful beginning to our education. Most people have a favorite crayon color. It could be because that color makes you smile, or reminds you of a favorite toy or item of clothing, or maybe because it takes your imagination on a wonderful ride. Today is National Crayon Day and we celebrate all the colors and the joys they have brought us while creating beautiful pictures.

Hear from a few of our staff what their favorite crayon colors are and share your favorite in the comments. Be sure to take time today to color!
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#Repost @happytoddlerplaytime
• • • • • •
🐦BIRD SENSORY BIN 🐦
It feeling more and more like spring here! So here is another fun and easy spring themed sensory bin with birds!! me I incorporate cardboard into the play again! Instead of paper I used cardboard for half of the filler and I made the bird house of cardboard as well! My preschoolers loved this bin and it makes a great sensory bin for spring!
👧🏽2.5 years +
🖐🏾 mess:
⏰ ~ 7 mins prep (without birdhouse)
SKILLS DEVELOPED: sensory play, fine motor skills, imaginative play, creativity.
_____________
PLaY🌈CReaTivEly
#happytoddlerplaytime

#letthemplay #sensorybin #pretendplay #playislearning #learningthroughplay #montessorilearning #montessoriactivity #playmatters #smallworldplay #preschoolers #homeschooling #homeeducation #homeschool #prek #handsonplay #earlyyearsideas #earlychildhood #earlyeducation #imaginativeplay #kidsathome #indooractivities
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PARTNER SPOTLIGHT! 💡

Its not too early to register your young one for summer camps with @kyscience and @stageonefamilytheater

Both organizations have camps for children as young as age 4 and have modified camp experiences to meet COVID safety protocols.
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#Repost @louisvillefreepubliclibrary
• • • • • •
Louisville, Kentucky

LFPL wants to make this Spring Break a “screen break,” by encouraging kids and caregivers to get outside, away from their TVs and computer screens.

Families can pick up a free Spring Break backpack from any LFPL location (while supplies last). Each backpack will include activities families can do together in their backyard, at the park, or wherever their spring break adventures take them! Then, from March 29 – April 3, the included Field Guide will feature a different topic and set of activities to do that day—from nature exploration to outdoor art to suggested reading lists.

Gorp @hiyogorp will get us started at 9am every day here and on www.lfpl.org/campLFPL and then you're off to do fun activities around that day's prompt!

Special nature-inspired Book Bundles are also available by request and can be customized based on a child’s age, interest, and reading level. Simply visit LFPL.org/BookBundles to order in advance.

Supplies are limited, pick yours up today! #springbreak #screenbreak #gorp #springbreakscreenbreak #getoutside #lfplkids #bookbundle
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Facebook Posts

Comments Box SVG iconsUsed for the like, share, comment, and reaction icons

Great tips from our partners at Community Coordinated Child Care (4-C)

#MyBigLittleAdventure
#growupgreat
#ready4kallianceAs you plan activities for the Week of the Young Child, remember the importance of your role as a guide, nurturing presence, and co-constructor of knowledge in an Ideal Learning environment. Read more on how to bring #ideallearning life in your classroom trustforlearning.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/Principle-and-Practice-092220-singles.pdf
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Great tips from our partners at Community Coordinated Child Care (4-C) 

#mybiglittleadventure 
#growupgreat 
#ready4kalliance

When we see this great Tulip Poplar from Bernheim Arboretum and Research Forest ....all we can hear is that small voice beside us....."what makes trees green?"

Has your child ever asked a question like that? Spring tends to prompt this specific color question because all the leaves budding out on the trees and the explosion of green against the blue sky. ("Why is the sky blue?" can wait for another day.)

It is always meaningful to see what your child might already know about any subject. They are little sponges after all. And so proud to share bits of things they know or guess. So start there.

Then you might go examine some leaves. Invite your child to notice, observe, describe, categorize, and start making some of their own connections based on what they see.

Then you can layer in some information. This can be what you know, or it can be a joint journey to a book, the internet, a friend who might be a "green thumb". You don't have to have all the answers, you just have to model the part about being curious...and the step toward finding out about things you wonder.

Some children are very capable of digesting pretty complicated material and can be repositories for all kinds of technical detail related to things they are passionate about - trucks, dinosaurs, their bodies, endangered species, plants, you name it.

Clorophyll makes plants green. It is a chemical. When you look closely at a leaf you can actually see where the clorophyll is by the colors of the parts of the leaves. Red tree leaves also have clorophyll, but it is mixed with other chemicals that make them red all summer long. (Flowering trees are different.).

The clorophyll sets off a process called photosynthesis. Which is a really fun word to say. And They Might Be Giants has a really fun album of kids songs - Photosynthesis is one of our favorite tunes!!

Only the green bits with clorophyll can generate the photosynthesis process which is how plants make their food and grow using water, air and light from the sun.

The really really important part of green leaves, clorophyll and photosynthesis is that the whole process cleans our air and makes sure we have enough oxygen to breathe!

Part of photosynthesis pulls in carbon dioxide and scrubs it, releasing breathable oxygenated air. This is called respiration.

So this is the superpower of one amazing tree.

And at Bernheim, or on your block, you can breathe in that nice clean air and thank a tree.

It's all about being green! 🌱🪴🍃Tulip poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera) is a native signature tree on the Sun and Shade Loop. The valvate (meaning having adjacent edges abutting rather than overlapping) buds are beginning to open and unfurl the first leaf of the season. Many times, flowering trees will produce the flower first and the leaf shortly after. Tulip poplar does this the other way around. Keep a look out for bright yellow tulip shaped flowers sometime in late May.
... See MoreSee Less

When we see this great Tulip Poplar from Bernheim Arboretum and Research Forest ....all we can hear is that small voice beside us.....what makes trees green? 

Has your child ever asked a question like that?  Spring tends to prompt this specific color question because all the leaves budding out on the trees and the explosion of green against the blue sky.  (Why is the sky blue? can wait for another day.) 

It is always meaningful to see what your child might already know about any subject.  They are little sponges after all.  And so proud to share bits of things they know or guess.  So start there.  

Then you might go examine some leaves.  Invite your child to notice, observe, describe, categorize, and start making some of their own connections based on what they see.  

Then you can layer in some information.  This can be what you know, or it can be a joint journey to a book, the internet, a friend who might be a green thumb.  You dont have to have all the answers, you just have to model the part about being curious...and the step toward finding out about things you wonder.  

Some children are very capable of digesting pretty complicated material and can be repositories for all kinds of technical detail related to things they are passionate about - trucks, dinosaurs, their bodies, endangered species, plants, you name it.  

Clorophyll makes plants green.  It is a chemical.  When you look closely at a leaf you can actually see where the clorophyll is by the colors of the parts of the leaves.  Red tree leaves also have clorophyll, but it is mixed with other chemicals that make them red all summer long.  (Flowering trees are different.). 

The clorophyll sets off a process called photosynthesis.  Which is a really fun word to say.  And They Might Be Giants has a really fun album of kids songs - Photosynthesis is one of our favorite tunes!!  

Only the green bits with clorophyll can generate the photosynthesis process which is how plants make their food and grow using water, air and light from the sun.  

The really really important part of green leaves, clorophyll and photosynthesis is that the whole process cleans our air and makes sure we have enough oxygen to breathe! 

Part of photosynthesis pulls in carbon dioxide and scrubs it, releasing breathable oxygenated air.  This is called respiration.  

So this is the superpower of one amazing tree.  

And at Bernheim, or on your block, you can breathe in that nice clean air and thank a tree.  

Its all about being green!  🌱🪴🍃

Loose Parts Play!

This week we've been sharing about the benefits of playing with loose parts.

Imagine: piles of man made and natural items, with no instructions or expectations for how they are used. Your child is in charge, and every well may surprise you.

How do you think this kind of olay experience feels for your child? Test it out and let us know.

Try this.

Gather a few empty soda bottles and other plastic containers and lids. You might go ahead and cut up a few of the bottles to add some variety to the mix. Add in some tape, some glue and some pain/brushes. Then sit back and see what happens.

(Pictured: This ladybug is a resident at Kentucky Science Center Science Depot and was made from a soda bottle. Can you see it?).
... See MoreSee Less

Loose Parts Play! 

This week weve been sharing about the benefits of playing with loose parts.  

Imagine: piles of man made and natural items, with no instructions or expectations for how they are used.  Your child is in charge, and every well may surprise you.  

How do you think this kind of olay experience feels for your child?  Test it out and let us know.

Try this.  

Gather a few empty soda bottles and other plastic containers and lids.  You might go ahead and cut up a few of the bottles to add some variety to the mix.  Add in some tape, some glue and some pain/brushes.  Then sit back and see what happens.  

(Pictured: This ladybug is a resident at Kentucky Science Center Science Depot and was made from a soda bottle. Can you see it?).

We've been having a lot of conversation among our collaborators about #babyplay

Simple sensory fun with a dose of fine motor skills.

Today.....this caught our eye!!

#Repost @learnandbloom
• • • • • •
• Pom Pom drop •⁣
I made a pom pom drop for my older boys when they were around this age and I remember how much they loved it. Super simple to remake for my 1yo now using a laundry basket, some cardboard tubes and pom poms!⁣

This activity develops their hand eye coordination, pincer grasp and fine motor skills as they purposefully choose and release each pom pom down the tube. It also makes a great sensory experience, feeling the fuzzy pom poms with their fingers and toes!⁣

Keep in mind pom poms are a choking hazard so always supervise closely. ⁣

#babyplay #babyplayideas #babysensory #babyactivitiesathome #learningmadefun #learningisfun #playislearning #playbasedlearning #playathome #busytoddler #toddlerplay #toddleractivities #kidsactivities #letthembelittle #lovetolearn #kidslearning #toddlerplayideas #sensory #sensoryplay #sensorybin #invitationtoplay #everydayplayhacks #sensorytray #diymum #diytoys
... See MoreSee Less

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